Jan 23, 2013

Several Videos about Sartre Works

One of the big projects I'm taking on as I develop this online Existentialism course is producing a series of lecture videos on one of the most important -- indeed iconic -- works of the Existentialist movement(s), Jean-Paul Sartre's Being And Nothingness: An Essay in Phenomenological Ontology. I'm expecting that to demand quite a few sessions dedicated to the text -- if Kierkegaard's Philosophical Fragments could eventually require seven lecture videos to really do justice to it, it's hard to picture that Being and Nothingness could be effectively covered in anything less.

This touches on an interesting issue, about which I'll have to do some thinking and writing-- rather than just reacting and plowing on through.  When I first envisioned -- and planned the sequence of videos for this Existentialist Philosophy and Literature course, thirty-five or at most forty one-hour videos seemed like the likely cutoff point.  I'm already at twenty-nine videos (thirty if you count the still-to-be-uploaded Nietzsche video I shot last night), and have yet to shoot any on a number of authors -- Shestov, Jaspers, Marcel, Kafka, De Beauvoir, just to name a few -- and there's many more yet to add on Heidegger, Rilke, Sartre,and Camus.  So, clearly this course is going to have to assume a quite different structure and configuration than originally intended -- exactly what, I'm not sure.

In any case, although I've yet to to record the majority of the lectures on Jean-Paul Sartre's writings, I can nevertheless offer four so far.  I think one of the best places to start with understanding Sartre, and his views about Existentialism, is his popular lecture, "Existentialism Is a Humanism"


 

There's also three videos about literary works which in some way emblemize or embody Sartre's existentialist philosophy -- experimentally, experientially, through narrative, character, dialogue, as well as detailed, stylistically superb phenomenological descriptions and metaphysical excurses.

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